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A prostate cancer detection software system to help pathologists quickly identify suspicious areas of tissue, developed by Paige, will be investigated in a multicentre clinical study led by Oxford University as part of a successful NHSx Artificial Intelligence Health and Care Award application.

Paige Prostate automatically detects and highlights areas of suspicious tissue, allowing the pathologist to quickly identify if cancer is present in the patient biopsy. The software also measures and grades the severity of tumours it detects, all of which assists the pathologist in accurately and efficiently diagnosing cancer and influencing important treatment decisions in patients with prostate cancer.

This award means that Oxford University and its NHS partners North Bristol NHS Trust and University Hospitals Coventry and Warwickshire, together with Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, will use Paige Prostate prospectively in a real-world cancer laboratory setting, taking the technology one step closer to widespread use in the NHS to benefit patients.

Oxford University was one of five lead organisations to receive Phase 4 funding, which was announced by the Health and Social Care Secretary Matt Hancock on 16 June 2021. The AI Award is a significant government initiative making £140 million available over four years to accelerate the testing and evaluation of artificial intelligence technologies which meet the aims set out in the NHS Long Term Plan.

 

I see this both as a natural evolution and key transformational point for histopathology. With this award we can advance the adoption of powerful technology to help pathologists by demonstrating the system-wide potential of using AI-based diagnostic systems in routine reporting. - Professor Clare Verrill from Oxford University’s Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences and Oxford University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Principal Investigator on the project

This is a histopathologist-led study and builds on investments made in digital pathology technology and infrastructure as part of the PathLAKE Centre of Excellence for digital pathology and artificial intelligence. Professor Verrill’s experimental pathology work is supported by the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre. 

Read the full story on the University of Oxford website